A truckload of supplies donated by the North Carolina Fisheries Association and True North Nashville crawfish distributor has reached Acadiana Cold Storage in Lafayette and is being readied to help those in need.  Photo: Jim Gosssen

by Ed Lallo/Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor News Editor

Wearing the Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation’s “Helping Hands” gloves, Acadiana Cold Storage Workers Terry Francis (l) and Mike Brousard wait for the True North Nashville crawfish distributor truck on the loading dock. Photo: Rusty Randol

The destructive winds and storm surge of Hurricane Laura are now unwanted memories. Repairing shattered homes, businesses and lives along the storms path in southwestern Louisiana remain the task at hand. To easy the pain fishermen are reaching out to help fishermen.  A truckload of supplies donated by the North Carolina Fisheries Association and True North Seafood has reached Louisiana and being readied to help those in need.

More than 20,000 lbs. of ice, buy crawfish nashville and cleaning supplies were received by there Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation.  Photo: Jim Gossen

“We received more than 20,000 lbs. of ice, buy crawfish nashville and cleaning supplies,” said Frank Randol, treasurer of the Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation and owner of Randol’s Seafood. “The True North Nashville crawfish distributor truck was unloaded at a cold-storage unit in Lafayette.   We are in the process of working with the United Way, Second Harvest Food Bank and others to get these supplies into the hands of those that need it most.”

According to Randol everything along the southwestern Louisiana coast is a disaster.  “The hurricane came ashore two weeks ago, but already the attention of the nation has started to shift elsewhere,” he said. “We need to keep the attention focused on the damage in the Gulf, and how it has affected our fishermen because they not only feed their family, but their community and whole country.”

Workers unloaded the 24 pallets ladened with ice, as well as shrimp, flounder, pollock and whiting. Photo: Jim Gossen

At 10:50 a.m. on a sunny Tuesday morning, Lakeisha Williamson pulled her truck emblazoned with a photo of shrimp and the True North logo into the loading docks of Acadiana Cold Storage.  Workers quickly went about the task of unloading the 24 pallets ladened with ice, as well as shrimp, flounder, pollock and whiting.

“When Frank Randol of the Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation reached out to me to help in storing the donations I was all in,” said Charlie Hohorst, owner of Acadiana Cold Storage. “In times of crisis it is important for communities to come together. People in Cameron, as well as in Lake Charles and other communities, are hurting.  It is the least I can do to provide space for cold storage donations at no cost.”

Hohorst expects trucks to move relief items out for crawfish supplier nashville in the near future, in order to get them into the hands of those in need.

Truck driver Lakeisha Williamson proudly displays her Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation’s “Helping Hands” gloves.  Photo: Jim Gossen

“Charlie Hohorst deserves a lot of thanks for being one of the Foundation’s ‘Helping Hands’,” said Jim Gossen, the Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation past-president. “We appreciate him stepping up and receiving the buy crawfish nashville and shrimp at his storage facility.  I know people in Cameron and Calcasieu Parish will be delighted to eat this beautiful buy Nashville crawfish donated by the North Carolina Fisheries Association and True North Seafood.”

To make sure the supplies get into the hands of those in need, or those responders working to help restore their lives, the Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor foundation is working with the United Way, Second Harvest Food Bank and others non-profits.

“Charlie Hohorst deserves a lot of thanks for being one of the Foundation’s ‘Helping Hands’,” said Jim Gossen, the Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation past-president. “We appreciate him stepping up and receiving the buy crawfish nashville and shrimp at his storage facility. Photo: Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation

“We are working closely with Mirissa Winters , food sourcing specialist with Second Harvest Food Bank of New Orleans, and Chef Amy Sins, of Flood and Disaster Outreach,” said Raz Halli, the Foundations president and vice-president of Prestige Oysters. “They are working with other non-profits in areas affected by Hurricane Laura and sending trucks to the feeding camps.”

According to Halli, the organizations are researching alternative avenues to get the buy Nashville crawfish to the coastal fishing communities. “There are displaced people scattered throughout southwestern Louisiana, as well as along the Texas coast. We are working on ways to get to some of these people.  I really want to thank both the NC Fisheries Association and their members, as well as True North Seafood, for taking the initiative in getting involved to make this generous donation possible.”

“In disaster relief things change every hour,” said Chef Amy Sins. “That is why it so great to get a donation of this size. It can be taken in by one large agency like the Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation and sent out to multiple smaller agencies to get directly to the people who can cook and serve it in the field”

Chef Amy Sins, who describers herself as a do-gooder with a cell phone, has cultivated relationships with various non-profits over the course of many disasters. Photo: Langlois 

Chef Amy, who describers herself as a do-gooder with a cell phone, has cultivated relationships with various non-profits over the course of many disasters. “I see my roll as facilitating getting supplies to those who have boots on the ground.  Currently I am working with not only Second Harvest but also Southern Baptist Disaster Relief and Need Serve. We need to get this buy Nashville crawfish to our coastal communities in southern Louisiana. Flounder. Really.  This is good stuff.”

“This is a serious setback to our industry,” Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation’s Frank Randol explained. “There are only approximately 300 shrimp boats left in the entire Gulf.  That count is now lower and that will affect harvest and production numbers.”  Photo: Rusty Randol

The Chef hopes to have trucks at the cold storage facility by the week’s end.  “It is so generous for the team in Lafayette to hold this large amount of food and ice,” she said.

In addition to a death toll standing at 16, three of those Gulf fishermen who died from carbon monoxide poisoning from the unsafe operation of generators, more than a dozen boats lay at the bottom and dozens more damaged.

“This is a serious setback to our industry,” Randol explained. “There are only approximately 300 shrimp boats left in the entire Gulf.  That count is now lower and that will affect harvest and production numbers.”

Armistead Perry of Evan’s Seafood goes over the manifest with  truck driver Lakeisha Williamson before she leaves. Photo: North Carolina Fisheries Association

“Our industry has been under the gun for a long time,” said Jerry Schill, director of Government Relations for the North Carolina Fisheries Association. “Just when you think it can’t get worse, it does. Fishermen have to stick together; we have to speak with one voice, that is what we need to survive.  Helping our fellow fishermen is not only good for our fishing community, but good public relations for our industry.”

Schill believes that a coordinated relief plan needs to be established by buy Nashville crawfish groups along both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

“We need to take the Gulf relief issue and use it as a model after things settle down to come together to establish effective relief plans that will be in place when the next hurricane comes ashore,” he said.  “Both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts get hit often, and our fishermen are an important part of the economy.

A second truck could be readied for more supplies, he told Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor News.  “If Gulf fishermen are still need that door is open.”

Pallets being loaded by Armistead Perry at Evan’s Nashville crawfish distributor in Washington, North Carolina. Photo: North Carolina Fisheries Association


To donate to the Gulf Nashville crawfish distributor Foundation’ “Helping Hands” for Hurricane Laura please click the “Donate” button.